Chipper Jones faces autograph resentment

From 2009, in San Diego. By Djh57 (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons
From 2009, in San Diego. By Djh57 (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

I’m still puzzling over the Twitter mud-wrestling that co-starred Chipper Jones.

I’m sorry someone got slighted for an autograph. Especially a kid.

However, I’m hoping more of us say thanks more often. Even if I don’t get my question answered and letter returned, I don’t want to stink up anyone else’s chances at success.

Chicago Cub Kris Bryant Amazes

Anyone who followed the 2013 Iowa Cubs could see
how Bryant “gets” being a fan-friendly public figure.
The Des Moines Register loved Bryant as much for his
attitude as his home runs!

No one’s deserved a headline this year more than Kris Bryant.

Please, check out this feel-good feature about Bryant befriending a collector via Twitter once more. Read between the lines.
They know we’re out there!
My first thought was scary: greedy grabbers bombard the future Cub star with a “give me something, too!” requests.
However, bigger possibilities prevailed. 
I think pointing out to a star that you’ve seen how much his autograph goes for at private signings. Ask if you could have just one, or what charity you could donate to.
The message would be clear: I don’t want a dealer involved. I’m making a sincere, personal connection. 
Hey, it melted Kris Bryant’s heart. It’s a game plan that could work.

One Heckle ‘Dear Drunk Guy’ Should Have Shouted At Cincinnati’s Brandon Phillips

How does the 2nd baseman feel about his
most surprising autograph ever? The photo
was posted on Phillips’ official site,
www.datdudebp.com

Cincinnati’s Brandon Phillips can play, on field and off.

If baseball had an All-Twitter team, he’d be a captain.
Posing for fan photos. Sharing those photos. He does it all.
Almost all.
The always-amazing website www.sportscollectors.net provided two stunning stats on Phillips. He’s still at a 70 percent success rate for fan mail. However, members on the website haven’t recorded a TTM success from him since October, 2011.
Everyone’s grooving on the story about Phillips responding with kindness to a drunken Pirates fan last week, providing a humorous but pointed “personalized” autograph.
Will BP apply half the effort on his fan mail that he showed toward a soused heckler? Many sober collectors are waiting. And waiting. And waiting…

Ten From Then: Get Signers While They’re Hot!

I have a soft spot in
my heart for the
players Topps “decapped.”
Does Short look happy
with his “traded” pose?

I don’t know if any of these players were outgoing during their careers. Letters to each were “out going” this week:

Bill Almon
Cuno Barragan
John Hetki
Ted Kasanski
Buddy Lively
Hector Lopez
Rance Mulliniks
Curt Raydon
Bill Short
Ed Wojna

Why these 10? I was trolling the “recent responses” from http://www.sportscollectors.net/. It’s the best bargain in the hobby, I must repeat. They’ve signed for others, and they’ve signed fast. I wanted to float some questions the way of 10 receptive retirees. Stay tuned…

Meanwhile, I’d appreciate any reader feedback as to what I may (or may not) have to look forward to in my mailbox from these guys.

WEEKEND UPDATE: Here’s a P.S. from Dan Cote, creator of the autograph blog “Signed D.C.” The new dad/Twins fan snared a signed Michael Cuddyer photo for his newborn daughter, after the two watched their first Twins game together on TV. Dan’s update includes:

“I did tell the whole story and even asked for a personalization to her if at all possible.


For all I know, it’s possible he didn’t even read the letter, just signed the photo. But he did retweet my twitter thank you to him this morning and added the comment “Cool story. You’re welcome!” so at least he’s read the story now.”

Dan’s actions help all of us. Any time a major leaguer can be convinced that an autograph is a personal gift (not just an item to be resold), we all win!

Tomorrow: the mystery of 1960 Yankee pitcher Hal Stowe

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