Return envelopes? Hurler Mike Caldwell pitches possible SASE solution

“I like to taste food, not glue.”

— Pitcher Mike Caldwell

Caldwell’s Facebook memo to collectors has appeared on www.sportscollectors.net and throughout hobby forums. He brought up great suggestions. Caldwell has reasonable rules for TTM autographs. 

Besides, anyone who’ll keep signing for free, stating out loud that collectors don’t need to enclose money, should be given extra attention.

One request that caught my eye first was Caldwell’s wish that collectors stop using envelopes you have to lick. 

Don’t forget that www.baseball-almanac has a huge collection of autographs. Each signature is displayed on each player’s personal page.

My first concern was the empty envelope. Anyone who’s gotten an empty SASE knows that special disappointment. What might have been inside? 

Did someone not get the memo on how a self-sealing envelope works?

Sure, the self-seal SASE will be more expensive. But, once it is sealed, it stays sealed.

If you want to try self-seal envelopes, consider adding a sentence at the end of a letter. Something like: “I’m grateful and eager to have your autograph. In fact, I’ve enclosed a special envelope for your reply. Just remove the paper strip, and your signature will be safely on its way!”

Readers, please let me know what type of envelope you prefer using. Have you had problems with the other kind of envelope?

 

 

Charging for TTM autographs? Who gets the money? Baseball Address List creator Harvey Meiselman weighs in on hot hobby topics

Talk about hobby hope! The 2019 Baseball Address List will help ring in my new year.

His letter to past address list buyers got me psyched for the long winter. As usual, Harvey’s adding features and updates to his 2019 edition. For instance, this volume will have a list of more than 250 baseball names who are now charging for TTM autographs.

Whoa! How many?

“Yes, over 250 players are now charging,” Harvey said.  “Some are donating the money to charity, but most are keeping the money themselves. They see the value of baseball autographs on eBay and places like that and want to get in on the action and make some money on their signatures. No big surprise with what PastPros is doing with a lot of the lesser-known MLB players. Charging ridiculous fees (they make almost as much on a handling charge as the players make on a signature) and all requests have to go through their company in Canada so it takes a long time. I hear a lot of complaints from my customers about them.”

I asked about high-end autograph fees (as someone who has never paid by mail for any autograph). Harvey rattled off examples: “Lou Brock used to charge $85 a signature but he is no longer able to sign due to health reasons. Orlando Cepeda gets $60 per signature. Roger Clemens gets $100 per signature. Reggie Jackson gets $89 for a signature. Whitey Ford gets $40. Pete Rose gets $100 per signature. Nolan Ryan gets $90.There are a few that get over $30 per signature but most are in the $10-25 range.”

How can Harvey often update addresses of moved players so quickly? He has address-hunting experience that runs far beyond his days in the hobby. “My search engine costs me $400 a month and is updated every week,” he said.” It was the same search engine I used when I was a skip tracer at a Florida bank. That’s why my lists are so good.”

To learn more about Harvey’s address lists (baseball is just one of many sports he covers), go to www.SportsAddressLists.com.

Congrats, Red Sox! Here’s Some Autograph Inspiration from Bobby Doerr, Boston’s ‘Silent Captain’

Doerr added this postcard often as a free bonus
into many of his replies.
An amazing man!

To celebrate Boston’s World Series win (and my return to Blogville), I wanted to share a 2011 post. The late second baseman gave stunning reasons why he never stopped signing by-mail requests. Let’s hope his same devotion to fans and The Game rubs off on the 2018 World Champions.

And now, it’s flashback time!

My admiration for Bob Doerr grows every year.

A Hall of Famer since 1986, he should be a charter member of any Autograph Hall of Fame.

While some mortals complain about trying to send Christmas cards to two dozen people, this 93-year-old baseball icon signs thousands of autographs a year. He keeps thousands of letters a year straight. Sign the ball here. Add your Hall of Fame year. All those requests for inscriptions, pens, whatever. Doerr delivers!

Thankfully, the “Silent Captain” was anything but when I asked him about his feelings about autographs. He replied on his official stationery, complete with the HOF logo and BOB DOERR as letterhead.

Q: How many autograph requests come in the mail weekly? How do you manage?

A: I average between 50 and 100 requests per week. Some days there are 30 or more requests and some days there are only 1 or 2. Very rarely are there days when there aren’t any. I do have a person who regularly helps me with the mail. Two people when I split my time between here and the Rogue. I also have family and friends that fill in from time to time.

Q: You’ve never stopped signing. Other Hall of Famers demand a fee. Or, they just ignore fan mail. Why are you different?

A: I have always enjoyed the fans. Their support and encouragement is inspiring. I also feel that we as players are honor-bound to respond to them. After all, they are the reason we are able to get paid for playing the sport we love.

Q: How can collectors show their thanks? Is there a charity you support that we could help with?

A: As to showing your thanks, I guess the best way to do that is to educate other collectors on good ‘request etiquette.’ So many either send way too much (I try to limit it to about 4) or they don’t send proper postage (etc.) or both.

I hope these answers are helpful to you. Thank you for your interest in time.

The letter is signed “Bob Doerr,” with that careful penmanship.

I could read Doerr’s words all day:

Fans…inspiring…players…honor-bound…the sport we love.

This man’s autograph isn’t signed with ink. Doerr’s pen is filled with gratitude.

*************************************************

I’ve never asked before. But now, I’m asking for Bob Doerr.

Doerr never wrote, “Send me money.” He never even asked for any of us to donate to charity.

All he wants is more collectors to learn and respect “request etiquette.”

Share this post. Tweet. Use any social media. Spread the Hall of Famer’s hope.

I thank you. I know that this throwback hero would, too.

Sportscollectors.net remains a hobby all-star

After a summer away, I’m eager to make my comeback.

My first move to get back in the game was reconnecting with my favorite website.

I signed up with www.Sportscollectors.net back in 2012. I’ve never left.

Their hobby forum keeps me up to date if someone’s address changes. Post a question, and you’ll get results fast. Has a former player just started charging for autographs? The forum will have answers.

Collectors log their TTM attempts and results, including how long the response took. 

Save time. Save postage. Make new hobby friends. For just $14.99 a year, you can’t go wrong.

 

An open letter to 2-time World Series champ Aubrey Huff

Dear Mr. Huff:

I’ve never written to you before. Therefore, I hope you’ll consider this blog post a sincere substitute for a letter.

Your new biography Baseball Junkie sounds quite courageous, helping many readers about to take a wrong turn in life.

As someone who’s been writing about correspondence with former players since 2010, I wanted to commend you on your willingness to recognize collectors and fans by mail. In fact, I saw on www.sportscollectors.net that collectors had reported success on 278 of the 486 letters to you they had tracked over the last 15 years.

In other words, your .570 signing average is admirable, considering that some fans were writing you at your team addresses. Nonetheless, potential readers who collect might hesitate to read your life story, considering that getting an autographed copy by mail might be iffy.

I think your book will get some raving fan support, due to the hand-signed letter you’ve been sending with your autograph reply. Muhammad Ali discovered the same thing. A typed message may seem like mere advertising to some. However, a signed item is something more: a collectible worth keeping and sharing. You’ve picked the smarter, second route for connecting with potential readers

Jim Campanis was famed as a “can’t miss” TTM autographer years before his memoir came out. When Born into Baseball appeared, sharing the news in SASEs that included an autograph seemed natural, even welcomed. Although he’s been autographing books purchased directly from him, Jim’s found ways to boost sales by including autographed photos with a purchase.

Thanks again for sharing your heart with so many in the world of baseball. We’ll be watching our mailboxes for more exciting moments from you!

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