Everett “Skeeter” Kell Remembers George, One Hall Of Fame Brother

Posted June 28th, 2010 by Tom Owens and filed in Connie Mack, Everett 'Skeeter' Kell, George Kell, Philadelphia Athletics


Everett “Skeeter” Kell might have been a Tiger.

The infielder with the 1952 Athletics explained in a moving letter why he wound up in Philadelphia, not Detroit — beside future Hall of Fame brother George.

“Skeeter” replied:

“We were very close. I spent six weeks living with him when I was 18 in Detroit. I worked out with the Tigers each day they were home. Mister (Connie) Mack of the A’s saw me practice and signed me.”

Kell reflected on his short career:

“I enjoyed most of my baseball and made lots of good friends, especially in Philadelphia, and to their homecomings as I was older.

I was not too great on being gone from my wife (now 62 years of marriage)and two sons so much.

This is why I retired, when I was sold to Havana, Cuba and could not take them with me.”

Thanks to artist Ronnie Joyner for sharing his swell creation. More info about Joyner’s artistry and the homecomings Kell mentioned can be found at the Philadelphia Athletics Historical Society website.

Everett "Skeeter" Kell Remembers George, One Hall Of Fame Brother

Posted June 28th, 2010 by Tom Owens and filed in Connie Mack, Everett 'Skeeter' Kell, George Kell, Philadelphia Athletics


Everett “Skeeter” Kell might have been a Tiger.

The infielder with the 1952 Athletics explained in a moving letter why he wound up in Philadelphia, not Detroit — beside future Hall of Fame brother George.

“Skeeter” replied:

“We were very close. I spent six weeks living with him when I was 18 in Detroit. I worked out with the Tigers each day they were home. Mister (Connie) Mack of the A’s saw me practice and signed me.”

Kell reflected on his short career:

“I enjoyed most of my baseball and made lots of good friends, especially in Philadelphia, and to their homecomings as I was older.

I was not too great on being gone from my wife (now 62 years of marriage)and two sons so much.

This is why I retired, when I was sold to Havana, Cuba and could not take them with me.”

Thanks to artist Ronnie Joyner for sharing his swell creation. More info about Joyner’s artistry and the homecomings Kell mentioned can be found at the Philadelphia Athletics Historical Society website.

Pitching Coach Herm Starrette Explains Movie “Bull Durham”

Posted June 27th, 2010 by Tom Owens and filed in Bull Durham, Herm Starrette


Thank you, Herm Starrette.

I love the movie Bull Durham (20th Anniversary Edition)
. I love the interaction on the mound, those conferences and pep talks.

I had to ask a real coach what a real mound meeting is like. What might be the funniest thing ever said — even if you don’t laugh until returning to the bench.
Starrette proved the movie might be more real than we imagined, replying:

“Little Latin kid. Bases load, no outs. can’t tell you his name. He said to me, ‘No problem.’ I said, ‘Yes, there IS a problem.'”

Starrette received World Series rings as Baltimore’s minor league pitching coordinator in 1970, and as Philadelphia’s pitching coach in 1980.

Now, he’s facing the ultimate challenge:

“I appreciate your letter. May God bless you and your family. I’ve had a hard time with prostate cancer. It’s a long haul taking radiation. Thanks. Your friend, Herm Starrette.”

Write to Herm. Remember him. He concluded with:

“Don’t have time to write you the whole story, but a beautiful career and quite educational. Learn a lot from different people.”