Pitcher Herm Starrette’s Signing Fee Matters

Some think of Herm Starrette as a 1960s Orioles pitcher. Others recall him as the pitching coach for the 1980 World Champion Philadelphia Phillies.

I think of him as a fighter.
Starrette, now 75, recounted his prostate cancer battle to me in a 2010 letter
Now, he’s asking for a donation per autograph: $5 minimum for cards and $10 to sign a baseball.
Yes, the money will help offset his mounting medical bills.
According to address list specialist Harvey Meiselman, Starrette has a 97 percent response rate. This is NOT a case of a never-signing-before name saying he’d reconsider autographs if money was added.
If you’ve gotten Starrette to sign before, drop him a note of encouragement. And, while he hasn’t issued a plea for extras, I know that he’s passed out autographed cards to medical staff during his many doctor visits.
Starrette has been giving for years. He seems entitled to ask for support versus his biggest foe yet. Let’s keep him in the game.

Famed Pitching Coach Herm Starrette Now Pitching Against Prostate Cancer

I spotted this on eBay for
“only” $13.49. Seems
the seller believes that
Mr. Starrette is deceased.
Hmmm….

This Herm Starrette update comes courtesy of Juan Rosales at Baseball Interactions. He wrote:

“I just got a response from Mr. Starrette. He’s still battling cancer. He seems like an awesome guy and is very proud of his career. He asked me if I could make him a batch of custom index cards for him to sign for his doctors and nurses. I sent them out a couple of days ago and told him to let me know if he needs more. He’ll be in my thoughts.”


I wrote about Starrette in this earlier feature. Anyone who wants to wish him well can at the address below:
103 Howard Pond Loop
 Statesville, NC 28625-2280

This is NOT a “he’s sick, get him to sign while you can.” Instead, it’s a plea for help.

Get an extra Starrette card. Print an extra custom. Then, use a post-it note. Clearly state, “FOR YOU” on the gift. Please, don’t hint or generalize in the letter that he can keep some if he wants. Make the gift specific. Imagine a caring medical staff, often taken for granted, displaying their Starrette autographs like badges of honor, awards they earned.

As long as he’s able, Starrette is sending notes with his autograph replies, including memories, or thanks for the extra cards. He’s a grateful gentleman who’s never forgotten us fans. Let’s do the same. Remember him as a 1960s Orioles hurler, the pitching coach for the 1980 World Champion Phillies or a chief ally for Red Sox GM Dan Duquette. Just remember Starrette, while there’s still time.

Meanwhile, enjoy this 2010 newspaper feature interview with Starrette.

Coming Thursday: Gary Pressy, a musical tradition for the Chicago Cubs.

Pitching Coach Herm Starrette Explains Movie "Bull Durham"


Thank you, Herm Starrette.

I love the movie Bull Durham (20th Anniversary Edition)
. I love the interaction on the mound, those conferences and pep talks.

I had to ask a real coach what a real mound meeting is like. What might be the funniest thing ever said — even if you don’t laugh until returning to the bench.
Starrette proved the movie might be more real than we imagined, replying:

“Little Latin kid. Bases load, no outs. can’t tell you his name. He said to me, ‘No problem.’ I said, ‘Yes, there IS a problem.'”

Starrette received World Series rings as Baltimore’s minor league pitching coordinator in 1970, and as Philadelphia’s pitching coach in 1980.

Now, he’s facing the ultimate challenge:

“I appreciate your letter. May God bless you and your family. I’ve had a hard time with prostate cancer. It’s a long haul taking radiation. Thanks. Your friend, Herm Starrette.”

Write to Herm. Remember him. He concluded with:

“Don’t have time to write you the whole story, but a beautiful career and quite educational. Learn a lot from different people.”

Pitching Coach Herm Starrette Explains Movie “Bull Durham”


Thank you, Herm Starrette.

I love the movie Bull Durham (20th Anniversary Edition)
. I love the interaction on the mound, those conferences and pep talks.

I had to ask a real coach what a real mound meeting is like. What might be the funniest thing ever said — even if you don’t laugh until returning to the bench.
Starrette proved the movie might be more real than we imagined, replying:

“Little Latin kid. Bases load, no outs. can’t tell you his name. He said to me, ‘No problem.’ I said, ‘Yes, there IS a problem.'”

Starrette received World Series rings as Baltimore’s minor league pitching coordinator in 1970, and as Philadelphia’s pitching coach in 1980.

Now, he’s facing the ultimate challenge:

“I appreciate your letter. May God bless you and your family. I’ve had a hard time with prostate cancer. It’s a long haul taking radiation. Thanks. Your friend, Herm Starrette.”

Write to Herm. Remember him. He concluded with:

“Don’t have time to write you the whole story, but a beautiful career and quite educational. Learn a lot from different people.”

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