Signatures for Soldiers: Autographs for a cause

Underrated pitcher and great guy. Check out his stat page at Baseball Almanac!

Underrated pitcher and great guy. Check out his stat page at Baseball Almanac!

Me. Me. Me.

No matter how well you do in making your case to a current or former player, chances are your request might seem like just another demand to an autograph signer.

What if someone convinced a potential signer that the request was for them, them, them?

Tim Virgilio has done that with his “Signatures for Soldiers” charity, raising more than $3,000 to benefit Military Missions in Action.

Nick Diunte and his Baseball Happenings site shined (as usual) getting Tim to share his vision of what autographs can do for the greater good. Nick’s feature pointed out that Woody Williams and Jim Leyritz were the first two notables to aid the Signatures for Soldiers team.

Tim is a licensed clinical social worker who has worked with former combat veterans for the last nine years. He chose carefully in finding an organization that’s adept at serving disabled vets.

To find out how you can purchase autographs for a great cause or help Tim’s efforts, write to him at signaturesforsoliders@yahoo.com or find the Facebook page by the same name.

Wrigley Field frowns on autograph collectors

Posted April 20th, 2015 by Tom Owens and filed in Atlanta Braves, Ron Santo, Wrigley Field
The new sign should read: "Don't Go Where Cubs Fans Have Gone Before." Michael Barera [CC BY-SA 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0), CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0) or GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html)], via Wikimedia Commons

The new sign should read: “Don’t Go Where Cubs Fans Have Gone Before.” Michael Barera [CC BY-SA 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0), CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0) or GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html)], via Wikimedia Commons

Everything is connected.

Wrigley Field’s remodel includes an anti-autograph shield keeping players segregated from signature-seeking fans outside the ballpark.

Re-read the Ron Santo biography A Perfect 10. His sons discussed how he’d sign everywhere, stopping the car along the route home.

The Atlanta Braves spring training address confounds collectors. Mail gets rejected, RTS, without rhyme nor reason.

Teams are redefining us. Not in a good way. Speak up for yourself, and your hobby, every chance you get. 

 

 

Look closer at that baseball card!

Posted April 16th, 2015 by Tom Owens and filed in SSPC
MossiPostcard

Don Mossi and 15 other Detroit players, coaches (and even trainer) appeared beside new Fords in a postcard set in 1962. The stories about this day would amaze!

I loved Rich Klein’s recent “Ramblings” column on the so-fun Sports Card Daily site.

“What should I ask about in a letter?” is a common question.

Even the smallest career (or non-career) may have been depicted on at least one baseball card.

Retired players may not have great insights about teammates or opponents. However, I’m guessing they won’t forget the details surrounding one of their few card appearances.

Former Twin Jerry Terrell, more than three decades prior, loved looking at his SSPC cards. He rolled his eyes, laughed and told me that the sweaty-faced photo was from a hot Florida spring training afternoon, right after running wind sprints. 

Where was the photo taken? When (early spring training or regular season)? Who suggested the pose (player or photographer)?

The only thing better than an autographed card is one that comes with a bonus history.