Letters and more: the best Jackie Robinson collection ever?

Posted April 11th, 2016 by Tom Owens and filed in Jackie Robinson, Rachel Robinson, Uncategorized
Rachel Robinson is shown accepting the Congressional Medal of Honor for her husband in 2005. (Photo credit: Eric Draper, Wikimedia Commons)

Rachel Robinson is shown accepting the Congressional Medal of Honor for her husband in 2005. (Photo credit: Eric Draper, Wikimedia Commons)

Except, it’s not for sale. Never will be, either.

The Jackie Robinson Papers were donated to the Library of Congress by Rachel Robinson in 2001. 

More than 7,000 items make up this collection. Most importantly, correspondence makes up a healthy part of the collection. Fan mail from around the world. 

Jackie’s own editing on the manuscripts for his two biographies.

Who knows? Some player’s wife might be collecting the letters you send, too!

Washington Nationals: the latest ‘poor us’ fan mail autograph tale

Stephen Strasburg (shown from 2014) makes some claims about fan mail that many collectors might dispute. (Photo credit: Keith Allison, Wikimedia Commons)

Stephen Strasburg (shown from 2014) makes some claims about fan mail that many collectors might dispute. (Photo credit: Keith Allison, Wikimedia Commons)

Want to collect something new?

Try assembling a team-by-team set of “fan mail exhausts us!”

The Washington Nationals are the latest addition to this cookie-cutter collection of questionable journalism. Reporters seem to write from the same blueprint. Players claim to adore letters from kids. Or, the weary major leaguers discuss a rare memorable letter from the last sincere fan in the universe.

However, readers are reminded that the players are taken advantage of every day by countless corrupt letter writers.

Players finish by claiming that they just can’t cope with all the demands.

In reality, current-player response rates have taken a nosedive in the last five years.

It’s hard to take these articles seriously. Just because a player claims it doesn’t make it so. These season-after-season puff pieces almost seem like paid advertorials devised by teams. As in “Buy our tickets and licensed products, but don’t expect anything in return.”

When will a reporter make the effort to seek out real information, like on www.sportscollectors.net, to see which standoffish players are trying to shine up their tarnished reputations with fans?